Category Archives for "Recipes"

Wattleseed and Chocolate Palmiers

Wattleseed and Chocolate Palmiers

Difficulty:1hat

Serves: 6

Recipe By: Rhonda Christie

Preparation time: 25 mins
Cooking time: 10 mins

50g milk chocolate chopped (good quality chocolate)
100g dark chocolate chopped (good quality chocolate)
2 tablespoons coffee crystals
2 tablespoons ground Wattleseed
extra ½ cup sugar
4 sheets prepared puff pastry

Preheat oven to 210c. Line 2 oven trays with baking paper. In a small bowl mix together chocolate, coffee crystals and ground Wattleseed. Divide the chocolate and Wattleseed mix into 4 equal amounts.

Sprinkle a sheet of baking paper with some of the extra sugar, place 1 sheet of puff pastry on the sugar and lightly roll with a rolling pin to press some sugar into the back of the sheet of pastry. Sprinkle one amount of the chocolate mix onto the pastry sheet.

On the one side of a second pastry sheet, sprinkle a little extra sugar. Put the sheet (sugar-side down) on top of the chocolate mix on the first sheet press slightly. Sprinkle on top another amount of the chocolate mix. Gently press chocolate mix into the pastry.

Pick up the 2 sheet of pastry on one side and fold so the pastry edges are half way from the centre. Repeat with the other side. Fold the sides over again towards to centre, leaving a small gap in the middle. Press the folded sides of pastry with a rolling pin to flatten slightly, then fold one side of the pastry onto the other, roll slightly.

Trim ends, cut into 12×1cm thick slices. Press cut sides of rounds into the extra sugar. Place on prepared baking trays leaving room for spreading. Bake for 10 minutes or until golden brown. Keep watch as they tend to brown quickly.

Repeat with remaining chocolate mix and sheets of pastry.

Allow to cool on baking racks, serve with ice cream.

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Paperbark smoked duck with Illawarra plum sauce

Paperbark smoked duck with Illawarra plum sauce

Serves: 4

Difficulty: 1hat

Ingredients

For the dish

4×150g duck breast
1 bunch water cress
1 chopped chilli hot
4 serves shiitake mushrooms
4 serves enoki mushrooms
1 Paperbark Roll
1 teaspoon Alpine Pepper
30g Illawarra Plum Sauce

Method

1. Use a cast iron or camp oven, line it with damp paperbark (Vic tells me he saves the off-cuts when thinning sheets for this) and set over a medium heat with the lid on
2. crust the duck breast with Alpine pepper
3. when the camp oven has heated enough to fill with smoke, place the duck breast inside for about 15~20 minutes or until the juices just run clear when the breast is pricked with a skewer
4. remove from the camp oven and rest in a warm place for 5 minutes this will help redistribute the juices in the meat
5. slice the duck into thin slices
6. slice shitake mushrooms and tease apart the enoki
7. wash the watercress

Styling

Place the cress in the centre of the plate and alternately, layer the mushrooms and duck. Garnish with the chilli and enoki mushrooms or some deep-fried vermicelli. Finish with the Illawarra plum sauce and serve with extra sauce to the side.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Paperbark smoked duck with Illawarra plum sauce is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Wattleseed pavlova

Wattleseed pavlova

Serves: 4

Difficulty:Wattleseed pavlova title=

Ingredients

7 egg whites
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon corn flour
1¼ cups castor sugar
300ml whipped cream
2 tablespoons Wattleseed extract
½ cup crumbed Dick Smith Foods’ Bushfood Breakfast cereal or biscuit crumbs
strawberry jam
juice of 1 lemon
¼ teaspoon Fruit Spice

Method

1. Add the Wattleseed extract to the cream and whip this to stiff peaks; this can and is best done the day before to allow the full flavour to develop; taste and add more extract if you want a stronger flavour
2. whip the egg whites to soft peaks; add the sugar and lemon juice slowly until stiff peaks form
3. line a baking tray with baking paper to cover an area the width of the baking paper and 1¼ times the length
4. spread the pavlova mix over the baking paper in a rectangular shape to a depth of 2cm
5. bake at 150°C for 10 to 15 minutes or until firm and nearly touch dry but not browned; it should look like soft meringue at this stage
6. remove from the oven and slide it off the tray to stop it cooking on; sprinkle the top with the crumbed breakfast cereal evenly coating the surface.
7. flip the meringue over, seasoned side down, onto a clean tea towel and remove the baking paper carefully; if it sticks, place a wet towel which has been heated in a microwave (or soaked with really hot water) on to the baking paper for 30 seconds; try peeling the paper away again and it should come away cleanly
8. spread the Wattle cream evenly over the meringue to a thickness of around 1cm or ½ an inch
9. roll up the pavlova using the long edge of the towel; cut the ends on an angle (good cooks will selflessly taste-test the trimmings)
10. before removing the towel completely, lift the pavlova onto a platter and roll the pavlova off the towel

Styling

Serve with a sour fruit coulis, for example, a berry jam mixed with enough lemon juice to taste tart and to pour like a thick sauce. I’d add a pinch of Fruit Spice to this sauce as well to enhance the fruitiness.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Wattleseed pavlova is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Wattleseed pancakes with riberry confit

Wattleseed pancakes with riberry confit

Serves: As many as you want

Difficulty:1hat

Ingredients

2-3 cups of self-raising flour
a pinch of salt
milk or water
a dash of Wattleseed Extract
oil spray for frying or a non-stick pan
Riberry Confit

Method

1. mix the flour and salt and add enough milk or water to just take up all the dry mix
2. continue adding liquid and stirring well to make a smooth, thick batter
3. add the wattleseed extract or the grounds to get a pale coffee colour and leave to stand for 15 minutes
4. adjust the thickness by adding more liquid, if necessary, choosing to make pancakes or crepes (thick or thin, respectively).
5. into a lightly oiled or non-stick pan heated to medium high heat, pour in a small ladle-full of batter (or use a squeeze bottle as I did on the show) using enough batter to make 12 or 13
pancakes all up (a good cook will always try one pancake in case it needs more flavour)
6. leave to cook through until the top side is just dry and flip the pancake over
7. cook briefly to finish (around 30 seconds)
8. store the cooked pancakes under a kitchen towel until all the pancakes are done

Styling

1. It’s your choice of stacking or spreading. All I can say is this is a frequent Sunday breakfast for me sometimes with wattleseed cream or Fruit Spice sour cream instead of the ice cream.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Wattleseed pancakes with riberry confit is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Hydro Majestic Hotel in the Blue Mountains

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffI normally don’t like stacked dishes because as soon as you hit it with a fork, it looks like the dog’s dinner. An alternative way to serve them is to cook thin crepes, pack them with the fruit mix and lavish them with cream or ice cream. Note that there are short cuts given in this recipe but some of the components are best prepared ahead of time or obtained ready-made.

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Wattleseed and walnut bread and butter pudding with stewed fruits

Wattleseed and walnut bread and butter pudding with stewed fruits

Serves: 4

Difficulty:1hat

Ingredients

500ml milk
500ml double cream
6 small bread rolls
40g butter
200g sugar
6 eggs
25g munthari
60g Wattleseed
60g walnuts, chopped
80g Quandong Confit
100ml honey
juice and zest from ½ orange

Method

1. Slice the bread rolls evenly and butter each slice, with the remaining butter, line the dariole dishes
2. place the bread into the dishes together with the munthari and walnut pieces, scattered between the bread slices
3. combine the double cream, milk and wattleseed and bring to the boil in a pot
4. in a bowl cream the eggs and sugar together until firm
5. gradually add the milk and cream mixture to the eggs stirring well
6. pour the mix into the darile dishes
7. in a deep tray, lay some folded newspaper on the base and place the dariole dishes on it; fill the tray with hot water half way up the sides of the dishes and cover the whole tray with foil
8. cook in an oven at 160° for 25 minutes, remove the foil and continue cooking for another 20 minutes or until done; the custard should be set and the bread just browned
9. when cooked remove the dishes from the tray and allow to cool on the bench
10. in a small saucepan, warm the honey; add the quandong and the orange juice and zest
11. simmer for 5 minutes and allow to cool

Styling

To serve, dust with icing sugar and glazed quandongs.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Wattleseed and walnut bread and butter pudding with stewed fruits is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Margaret River and restaurant Vat 107

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffThis is a really simple but delicious dessert which can be substituted any number of ways. Use different fruits such as mango, apricots, peaches or stewed pears. Substitute the various herbs with Australian or varietal mints or peppermint, try basil or chervil, licorice or aniseed and mix them into a range of alternative cheeses such as quark or cottage cheese, cream cheeses such as Philadelphia, Neufchatel, mascarpone or even straight sour cream or yoghurt. Try a range of pure honeys, maple syrup, palm sugar syrup, brandy butter, golden syrup or fruit syrups (rose hip, pomegranate etc). And finally, introduce different nuts such as pecans, pistachio, Brazil nuts, pine nuts etc.

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Ricotta figs and macadamia nuts

Ricotta figs and macadamia nuts

Serves: 4

Difficulty:Ricotta figs and macadamia nuts title=

Ingredients

4 large or 8 small figs
1 tablespoon ricotta cheese per fig
¼ ~ ½ teaspoon Lemon Myrtle
½ cup grape nectar
macadamia nut pieces (toasted) for garnish

Method and styling
Trim the fat end of each fig so that the fruit stands up-right. Cut the thin end with a cross to open up the figs but still keeping them in one piece. Mix the Oz Lemon into the ricotta, preferably at least 2 hours before serving as this allows the flavours to really penetrate the cheese. Place a tablespoonful of the prepared cheese in each cross cut fig. Grill until the figs are warm and
the cheese just bubbles. Plate up the figs, drizzle with the grape nectar and garnish with the toasted macadamia nut pieces. Serve immediately with a strong coffee for that hint of bitterness to add to the complexity of taste.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Ricotta figs and macadamia nuts are included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Margaret River and restaurant Vat 107

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffThis is a really simple but delicious dessert which can be substituted any number of ways. Use different fruits such as mango, apricots, peaches or stewed pears. Substitute the various herbs with Australian or varietal mints or peppermint, try basil or chervil, licorice or aniseed and mix them into a range of alternative cheeses such as quark or cottage cheese, cream cheeses such as Philadelphia, Neufchatel, mascarpone or even straight sour cream or yoghurt. Try a range of pure honeys, maple syrup, palm sugar syrup, brandy butter, golden syrup or fruit syrups (rose hip, pomegranate etc). And finally, introduce different nuts such as pecans, pistachio, Brazil nuts, pine nuts etc.

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Rainforest lime and macadamia nut pudding

Rainforest lime and macadamia nut pudding

Serves: 4

Difficulty:1hat

Ingredients

50g chopped macadamia nuts
135g butter
75g soft brown sugar
2 tablespoons Buderim ginger, lemon and lime marmalade
½ teaspoon Lemon Myrtle
150g rainforest limes, sliced whole
120g self-raising flour
½ teaspoon Outback salt
120g castor sugar
2 eggs, beaten

Method

1. Dry roast the chopped nuts until the fines just begin to darken
2. melt 15g butter in a pan, add the brown sugar and marmalade, stir well to dissolve the sugar; remove from heat and sprinkle in the Lemon Myrtle
3. butter a deep ovenproof dish and pour in the mixture; place the slices of limes over this mixture
4. in a bowl, sieve the flour and salt
5. in another bowl, beat the castor sugar with the remaining butter, add the eggs and flour gradually, stirring well
6. pour this mix carefully over the fruit and bake at 180°C for 35 minutes

Styling

When cooked, turn out on a dish so that the limes are on top or serve from the bowl. The mix will be pudding soft in the centre and really good to eat with ice cream or cream.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Rainforest lime and macadamia nut pudding is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Lillipilli in the Rocks

Recipe By: Benjamin Christie

Slightly spicy, sweet and sour is how I describe this Rainforest lime dessert pudding with macadamia nuts. The spicy sweet flavours come from the ginger marmalade and the sourness is from the wild limes. If you can’t get hold of Australian native limes, you can substitute them with regular limes. Make sure to remove the rind and the seeds or it’ll be too bitter to eat. This is not necessary if you are using the fully edible rainforest limes.

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Polenta and Lemon Aspen cake with sugar bag and Wild Rosella Cream

Polenta and Lemon Aspen cake with sugar bag and Wild Rosella Cream

Serves: 4

Difficulty:1hat

Ingredients

250g polenta
800ml of water
150ml Lemon Aspen Syrup
2 fresh figs
20g Wild Rosella Confit
50g castor sugar
30ml sugarbag
100ml fresh cream
40g Riberry Confit

Method

1. In a pot, combine the water, lemon aspen syrup and polenta; bring to the boil, stirring constantly
2. the polenta will take 5 -7 minutes to cook through, once at a boil
3. spoon out the polenta from the pot and place into a flat tray and allow to cool
4. once cool, cut into triangle or hexagon shapes, with three pieces per serve
5. in a bowl, briskly whip the fresh cream to stiff peaks and flavour with the sugarbag; use maple syrup as a substitute; set aside
6. slice the figs into thin slices
7. in another pot, heat castor sugar until dissolved; it may require a little water to soften the mix

Styling

Finally assemble the dish, by placing a piece of the polenta on the plate. Then add a little cream and fig slice and repeat, building up the dish. Garnish with cream, riberries and the sugared rosella.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Polenta and Lemon Aspen cake with sugar bag and Wild Rosella Cream is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Crowne Plaza Newcastle

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffWe seem to forget that polenta or corn was once only food for native American Indians and is now a world food crop. Contrast this to Australia where the only global food species native to this country is the macadamia nut. But times they are a-changing.

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Coconut and Lemon Myrtle brulée

Coconut and Lemon Myrtle brulée

Serves: 6

Difficulty:1hat

Ingredients

500ml full cream
130g sugar
3 egg yolks
1 tablespoon coconut milk powder
½ teaspoon Lemon Myrtle
2 ripe bananas
sugar

Method

1. Add the coconut powder to the cream and slightly warm the full cream in a pot on the stove
2. place the egg yolks with the sugar in a bowl and whisk briskly, creaming the mixture
3. add the cream to the mixture and add the Lemon Myrtle
4. place in moulds and place into a deep tray and half fill with warm water half way up the sides of the moulds; cover entire tray with foil; make sure it’s covered extremely well, as any gap will cause the brulée to scramble
5. place in a 160°C oven for 45 minutes
6. remove the moulds immediately from the water bath and allow to cool. refrigerate for at least 3-4 hours
7. slice the bananas on a diagonal and fan the slices out over the tops of the brulée

Styling

To serve, sprinkle the sugar on the top and heat with a gas torch to form a toffee crunch.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Coconut and Lemon Myrtle brulée is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Redgum Restaurant at Boronia House Mosman

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffThe Lemon Myrtle in this recipe could easily be substituted for other native Australian ingredients such as wattleseed or Australian Fruit Spice. Alternatively you could serve this brulée topped with Riberry Confit or Rosella Confit for something entirely different.

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Chocolate mousse tart with gumleaf cream and wild rosella flowers

Chocolate mousse tart with gumleaf cream and wild rosella flowers

Serves: 4

Difficulty: 1hat

Ingredients

200g plain flour
35g castor sugar
50g butter, softened
2 eggs
2 gelatine leaves
125g chocolate chips
200ml cream
3 drops gumleaf oil
35g castor sugar
10g Rosella Confit

Method

1. In a food processor using a pulse action, combine the plain flour, 35g of castor sugar and the softened butter
2. to this mix, add one egg being careful not to over beat; if the pastry is overworked it becomes tough
3. once mixed, wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour; this recipe can be doubled easily and the excess well wrapped in plastic wrap and frozen for other recipes
4. on a well floured bench, quickly roll out the pastry to about 5mm thickness and shape the pastry to fit the desired flat tray, in this case, 4×5cm flan tins
5. press the pastry up the sides of the tin; rest the tins in the fridge for a further 20 minutes
6. place a piece of greaseproof paper into the tin and fill with rice; this is known as blind baking and ensures the pastry does not slide down or form bubbles on the base; bake at 160°C for 15 minutes
7. when the cases are cool, place 125ml of cream into a small pot and bring to the boil, then remove from the heat
8. soak the gelatine leaves in cold water
9. place chocolate chips and the remaining egg into a blender and process for 30 seconds
10. while the machine is running, slowly pour the heated cream into the chocolate mixture blend until well mixed and the chocolate chips are melted, then add the squeezed gelatine
11. pour the mix into cool tart cases and refrigerate until set
12. with the remaining 75ml cream, briskly whisk together with 15g sugar and gum leaf oil; taste the cream after 2 drops of gumleaf oil adding more if necessary

Serve garnished with a dollop of sweetened gumleaf cream and Rosella Confit and syrup.

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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Chocolate mousse tart with gumleaf cream and wild rosella flowers is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Alberts Lakeside Restaurant Norwest Sydney

Recipe By: Vic Cherikoff

Vic CherikoffChocolate really suits some specific Australian flavours. If we think of semi-sweet, dark, rich chocolate, then Australian peppermint, gumleaf oil and aniseed myrtle complement well. Quandong, Kakadu plum, Illawarra plum, wild rosella but particularly Wattleseed really go well with white chocolate. Then for the middle of the road; milk chocolate, I’d suggest glace riberries, Oz Lemon, some of the spicy flavours and paperbark smoke flavours. Try some of these in this mousse recipe and see what your tastebuds tell you.

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