Soused sea perch fillets

Serves: 4

Difficulty: 1hat

Ingredients

4×200-250g sea perch fillets (or other white fleshed fish)
300ml water
300mls white wine vinegar
300ml white wine
¼ teaspoon Australian groundwater salt
3-4 Wild Lime Confit
½ teaspoon Lemon Myrtle

Method

1. In a shallow, poaching pan combine water, wine and vinegar and bring to a boil
2. add the fish to the boiling stock; it will take about 6-7 minutes to cook so after 2 minutes from adding the fish, turn down the heat to a gentle boil
3. remove the fish and place on paper toweling to absorb the excess moisture
4. dust with the Lemon Myrtle

Styling

1. Simply serve the finished fish as is with the small limes scattered over it or alternatively, use the Oz Lemon to flavour a mayonnaise or some reduced white balsamic vinegar
2. serve with rice and /or wild rice, couscous, bulgar, barley or other grains (Vic tells me he adds some hijiki seaweed and chicken stock to raw rice, cooks it with the absorption method
and then forks through some rice wine vinegar or mirin and palm sugar once it’s done – you could even make sushi with this, adding a piece of the fish to the formed rice and cutting
each lime into a fan for on top)

Notes

Cooking this way can be made even easier for big batches of fish (or scallops, prawns, yabbies etc) if you have a strainer or tray with drainer holes in the bottom to fit into the
poaching pan. The idea is to keep the poaching liquid hot and not to cool it off too much each time the cold seafood goes in. Cook one batch, drain and spice it up and then add the next batch to the constantly simmering liquid.
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Dining Downunder Cookbook

This Australian recipe of Soused sea perch fillets is included in the Dining Downunder Cookbook which can be purchased online at the Dining Downunder Online Shop. Also available online is a wide range of native Australian herbs and spices, sauces, syrups, infused oils and bush tucker ingredients such as wattleseed and paperbark rolls.

Episode: Australia Day on Sydney Harbour

Recipe By: Benjamin Christie

Benjamin ChristieCooking this way can be made even easier for big batches of fish (or scallops, prawns, yabbies etc) if you have a strainer or tray with drainer holes in the bottom to fit into the poaching pan. The idea is to keep the poaching liquid hot and not to cool it off too much each time the cold seafood goes in. Cook one batch, drain and spice it up and then add the next batch to the constantly simmering liquid.

Other recipes from this Episode

Other Episodes

Vic Cherikoff